Category Archives: learning disabilities

Walkathon Miraculous Success

As a nonprofit, you’re a little bit like the Wizard of Oz. In front of the curtain, you see the wonderful services being delivered to constituents. In back, there’s a swirl of activity and sweat to sustain the mission — something called fundraising.

We felt like the wizard waved a magic wand for us last weekend.We decided to launch a brand new fundraising activity and carefully laid all the groundwork for success. But, at some point, you look up and just hope it all comes together! When it does it feels like a miracle. That’s what happened at our first Walkathon “Stepping Up for Special Needs,” last Sunday. We extended the invitation, hoping for at least 100 people, and maybe netting a few thousand dollars. We realized we had to think small the first year, and grow it over time. Boy, were we wrong!

More than 500 people came out, and we cleared more than $30,000 in donations and sponsorships! It seemed miraculous but it was truly a testament to the strength of our ECLC “family” and the excellent work of our schools and adult services. Check out the video highlights!

Making the Most of a New School Year

A new school year always brings a certain element of change to you and your child’s life. For your child, it may entail adjusting to a new school, working with a new teacher, or at the very least having some new classmates.

school-spirit-3

ECLC’s school in Ho-Ho-Kus helped new students feel at home with a Spirit Day celebration, featuring music, dancing, chalk drawing and bubble-making!

Here are a few tips to help ease the transition for you and your child:

  • Keep routines consistent – to the extent possible, have your child follow the same morning and afternoon routines. With a lot of new places and faces occurring during the school day, the more routine and structure the child maintains in other parts of their day the better.
  • Make your child feel comfortable – work to familiarize your child with the name of the new school, the classroom teacher’s name, and the room number. Frequently discuss and reinforce these topics with your child.
  • Utilize visual schedules – picture schedules (written or on an electronic device) can help prepare the child for the day’s activities. They can be individualized and tailored to your child’s skill level. ECLC’s SCERTS Model makes use of visual supports throughout the school building and in the classrooms.
  • Limit homework and instructional demands – the primary focus should be on your child adjusting to a new physical environment and new people. The initial goal is to help establish the school building and classroom as a comfortable, friendly, and fun place to be!

Matthew Kuzdral M.S., BCBA

Teacher Relates to Students Because of Her ‘Disability’

When Victoria Johnson, who teaches at the ECLC school in Ho-Ho-Kus, walks into her classroom, she understands and feels the depth of the students’ frustrations on a personal level. The reason for this strong connection is that Victoria has struggled with her own learning disability, since she was a child. Her personal experience of struggling to overcome a disability provides her with a unique understanding and insight into her students. After years of under-performing in school, Victoria was classified with a learning disability (a processing disorder) in the sixth grade.

“At the time, my self-esteem was extremely low, and I had just about given up on learning. You can try so hard, and if you have difficulty processing information receptively and expressively, it becomes very challenging to learn. People don’t want to take the time to listen to you if you are not fast enough to get your point across,” she remembers.

Victoria Johnson inspires students every day!

Victoria Johnson inspires students every day!

But, Victoria persevered and eventually began to think of becoming a teacher of children with special needs. She wanted to pass along the strategies that had helped her succeed and help students with special needs gain the confidence to learn in different ways and build up their self-esteem to accomplish their goals.

Today, no matter what challenges a student is facing, Victoria can see through to the root of the problem and find a solution. Her mantra?: “I love these students!” She uses her strong organizational skills to reach goals and deadlines. And, she teaches her students that a sense of humor helps, to laugh at your struggles and mistakes rather than shutting down and giving up. She loves to teach students how to advocate for themselves and not to be afraid to try new things.

During her time at ECLC, Victoria has taken on a leadership role beyond the classroom. She has helped coordinate the annual prom, chaperoned weekend sleepovers at the school, taken students for holiday shopping trips, and mentored new staff members and graduate students. She also has successfully created partnerships in the community, involving students with packaging items for a local food bank. Her generous heart knows no bounds. She has walked in Autism Speaks walk in our area and organizes penny collections for the Kiwanis Club and soda can pop tops for Ronald McDonald House. We are so lucky to have Victoria as part our ECLC family!